Marginalia

& more
from the Editors
of Tongue: A Journal of Writing & Art




» Current Issue
» Website
» Facebook
» Twitter

The Shop-boy with the Wheelbarrow

by Umberto Saba

It’s good to recover in ourselves
lost loves, or reconcile ourselves to an affront,
but if life pent up inside weighs you down,
take it out of doors.

Throw open the windows, or go down
into the crowd; you’ll see how little it takes
to cheer you up: an animal, a game,
or, dressed in blue,

a shop-boy with a wheelbarrow
clearing the street with a loud voice,
who, if he finds the slightest downward slope,
runs no more, but flies.

The streets are full of people at that hour
who don’t keep quiet after dodging him.
The noisier the uproar and the wrath,
the more he swings his hips and sings.

“TV project Self Burial,” Keith Arnatt (1969)“TV project Self Burial,” Keith Arnatt (1969)

TV project Self Burial,” Keith Arnatt (1969)

In the weeks since the Thai military took power in a coup d’etat, poet Krit Lualamai has been responding to upheavals through drawings and poems.

Read More

The geography of Dante’s Divine Comedy as sketched by Albert RitterThe geography of Dante’s Divine Comedy as sketched by Albert Ritter

The geography of Dante’s Divine Comedy as sketched by Albert Ritter

At Kara Walker’s “A Subtlety, or the Marvelous Sugar Baby” (2014), children playing

“[T.S. Eliot] sees the world, not a waste place, but a place in which it is difficult to live and to have hope. As this was true of the Greeks, it is true of us. But that is not what struck me then. What struck me then was the way he wrote. You read it, you clap your hands. His poetry thinks as it feels…”

—Christopher Logue in conversation with The Paris Review, Summer 1993

“And so for me the act of writing is an exploration, a reaching out, an act of trusting search for the correct incantation that will return me to certain feelings whenever I want them. And of course I have never completely succeeded in finding the correct incantations.”

—from “Writing a Poem” by Thom Gunn
Judith and Holofernes (2012) by Kehinde WileyJudith and Holofernes (2012) by Kehinde Wiley

Judith and Holofernes (2012) by Kehinde Wiley

“…To paint’s to breathe,
And all the darknesses are dared. You chose
What each must reckon with.”

—from “Rembrandt’s Late Self-Portraits" by Elizabeth Jennings
2003.3.1 (2003) by Fang Lijun, on display at the Metropolitan Museum of Art2003.3.1 (2003) by Fang Lijun, on display at the Metropolitan Museum of Art

2003.3.1 (2003) by Fang Lijun, on display at the Metropolitan Museum of Art

Anne Carson & Robert Currie & Dante Micheaux, et al. perform ANTIGONICK at the 2012 John D. Criticos Prize award ceremony. 11/29/13, London

"A Wall + A Thought = An Art Piece" in Shoreditch, London"A Wall + A Thought = An Art Piece" in Shoreditch, London

"A Wall + A Thought = An Art Piece" in Shoreditch, London

Side-by-side portraits of Robert Browning and Elizabeth Barrett Browning at the National Portrait Gallery, LondonSide-by-side portraits of Robert Browning and Elizabeth Barrett Browning at the National Portrait Gallery, London

Side-by-side portraits of Robert Browning and Elizabeth Barrett Browning at the National Portrait Gallery, London

A portrait of Seamus Heaney by Tai-Shan Shierenberg at the National Portrait Gallery, LondonA portrait of Seamus Heaney by Tai-Shan Shierenberg at the National Portrait Gallery, London

A portrait of Seamus Heaney by Tai-Shan Shierenberg at the National Portrait Gallery, London

“For beauty is nothing
but the onset of terror we’re still just able to bear,
and we admire it so because it calmly disdains
to destroy us. Every angel is terrifying.”

—from Duino Elegies (1923) by Rainer Maria Rilke, trans. Galway Kinnell